Prioritising Affordable Childcare

Today, the Family and Childcare Trust published its annual survey looking at the cost of childcare – as with previous years, it has found that childcare costs have risen, by three percent in the last year alone, with parents paying an average of more than £6,600 per year for a part time nursery place. Following the roll out of new Government support schemes in the last few years, most parents are now entitled to some help with childcare costs but there are concerns that the different types of support can create a confusing picture, risking the situation where some parents are missing out on the help they need.

Of particular note is that fact it would be families with lower incomes and younger children who are the ones most likely to be squeezed by any increase in childcare prices – the survey finds some parents are still worse off in work once they have paid for childcare, especially larger families or families with young children.

I am pleased that, in Bristol, we have managed to keep all of our Children’s Centres open by coupling them with nurseries in the majority of cases, and by creating a funding environment that means we have not needed to close them.  The city has a high number of nurseries, which are a key part of our early years services. But along with other authorities, we are still awaiting confirmation from the Department for Education about a sustainable nursery school funding model that will be so critical in the future.

The importance of childcare provision has also been reflected citywide through the commitments put forward through our One City Plan. At our most recent City Gathering, providing affordable childcare was identified as one of the three key ambitions to take forward  as a city this year, alongside tackling gang violence and eradicating period poverty. This demonstrates our collective commitment to delivering affordable childcare.

We recognise that childcare costs are one of the key barriers to economic inclusion. This is why ensuring families have access to affordable childcare also lies at the heart of my inclusive and sustainable economic growth strategy. One of the first priorities for action is to pilot an affordable childcare and nursery education programme, enabling low income families and lone parents the opportunity to work. The Bristol Women’s Commission is also carrying out meaningful work around this aim, with their Women of Lawrence Hill Project. Once again, the Family and Childcare Trust’s annual survey shows that government support for childcare simply isn’t enough for most families. As a city, we are finding collaborative, place based solutions to national government’s shortcomings.

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