Author Archives: marvinjrees

Bristol’s progress on SEND

Today’s blog is by Councillor Asher Craig, Deputy Mayor of Bristol with responsibilities including Education and Children’s Services.

Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission (CQC) returned to Bristol last month to assess whether special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) services have improved since their last visit in 2019. We are pleased that their report recognises that our Local Area has made sufficient progress in addressing four of the five key areas of weakness highlighted in the initial Ofsted/CQC inspection in 2019, improving outcomes for children and young people (CYP) with SEND.

This reflects the dedication of staff to implement service improvements at pace over the last three years, despite the additional challenges of the pandemic. The full report has been published on Bristol’s Local Offer website, before Ofsted and the CQC publish it themselves on Friday.

While inspectors found that we had not made sufficient progress in addressing the difficult relationships with parents and carers identified in 2019, it is welcome that they found that “the majority of parents and carers accessing services and support more recently, are positive about their experience”. We will continue to work hard to deliver further progress, as we build on ongoing work to improve relationships through a community of groups approach.

The report also notes that inclusion is central to Bristol’s Belonging Strategy, which was co-produced with children and young people from across our city: putting their voices, needs and ambitions for the future at the heart of Bristol’s recovery from the pandemic. Launched in October last year, the strategy supports the One City aim that everyone in Bristol will have the best start in life, gaining the support and skills they need as they grow up to thrive and prosper in adulthood.

Ofsted/CQC’s observations and comments on our progress

  • Improvements in accountability are leading to better support for children and young people (CYP) with SEND and school leaders value the transformation of systems and processes that has taken place since the previous inspection.
  • The identification and assessment of CYP with SEND in Bristol is improving, with the Ordinarily Available Provision document detailing interventions to meet needs, within typical school assessment and support processes. There has been a cultural shift in the way that professionals and schools, work together which is improving the way that they work together to meet the needs of children and young people with SEND.
  • Effective joint working between professionals has resulted in real improvements to the timeliness and quality of education, health and care (EHC) plans. There is a stronger focus on improving outcomes and ensuring the child or young person and their family’s voice has been captured. This work is resulting in children and young people being placed at the centre of the EHC assessment process.
  • The support in Bristol for children and young people with SEND is getting better. Even so, leaders know there is more to do to ensure that all children and young people attend school regularly. The proportion of children and young people with an EHC plan who have been excluded from school has fallen. A range of strategies have been introduced to ensure that pupils who are at risk of exclusion get the help they need from schools and professionals.
  • Parents and carers have a more mixed view of the quality of support available to children and young people with SEND than at the time of the last inspection. Some parents and carers continue to lack trust in the system and feel that leaders are not acting in the best interests of their children. However, the majority of parents and carers accessing services and support more recently, are positive about their experience. Plans are progressing to re-establish a formal body to represent parents and carers.

Improving SEND services remains a priority for Bristol City Council, with dedicated council staff and SEND leaders working alongside our partners in health, education, parents/carers and CYP with a deeply held, shared commitment to improving outcomes for CYP and their families. Our work is underpinned by our strategic approach outlined in the Bristol Children’s Charter and the Bristol Equality Charter, as well as the Mayor’s pledge to provide 450 new specialist school places, which is on track to be delivered in 2023.

The Council and local area partners including health will now work with the Department for Education (DfE) and NHS England to determine next steps and look to build on this progress. Our focus will be on how we can better communicate and work with all our parents and carers, ensuring that the parent, carer and young person’s voice – in all its diversity – is at the heart of our co-production work in SEND.

Please follow the Bristol Local Offer Facebook page for more updates on our Ofsted/CQC progress.

Introducing a new journey sharing platform for Bristol commuters

Councillor Donald Alexander smiling on College Green, in front of City Hall. He has trees behind him.
Today’s guest blog is from Councillor Donald Alexander, Cabinet Member for Transport.

With Bristol’s Clean Air Zone starting next week, now is a good time for us all to continue considering how we can change the way we travel, to reduce our impact on the environment and make the city’s air cleaner.

To give commuters a helping hand, we’ve launched Join My Journey. This is a free to use online platform, which matches people up from the same workplace to share walking, cycling and car journeys.

It’s a great way to save money, reduce rush hour congestion and pollution, and connect with co-workers.

We’ve commissioned it, working alongside Travelwest and South Gloucestershire Council. We are now encouraging business leaders across Bristol and South Gloucestershire to sign up their companies and organisations so their staff can easily share journeys to work.

To get started all you need to do is register with the website and create a company hub. Once it’s been verified, you can then invite your colleagues to start using Join My Journey.

Anyone who doesn’t have many people to commute with at their workplace, the site can link up smaller businesses through an area hub. This means you can share journeys to work with people who live nearby or on the same route, who are travelling to the same area.  

Not only will it have a positive impact on the environment, but you could save money if you and some of your colleagues take it in turns to drive one another to work by sharing fuel costs and cutting down on the wear and tear of your vehicle.

We also wanted to give people the option to buddy up when walking or cycling to work, which is especially handy as we head into winter as it gets dark so early. It’s a good way to connect with people, keep fit, and enjoy the journey.

Users of Join My Journey smile in front of a car and a bicycle, Southmead Hospital is in the background.
Join My Journey at Southmead Hospital.

To make the most out of the platform, we need as many users as possible to register and create journeys. Our advice is, if you don’t find a match for your journey straightaway, keep checking as the more businesses and individuals that register, the more likely you are to find a match.

We’ve been trialling Join My Journey with the University of the West of England and North Bristol NHS Trust. More than 100 people have signed up so far and the feedback has been positive, especially because all the matching up is done behind the scenes, so all they need to do is encourage their staff to sign up.

To use Join My Journey, simply register, create or join a hub, search for a journey, then join a journey or host one.

Safety features include only being visible to colleagues in the same workplace or agreed businesses nearby. 

Get started at joinmyjourney.org.uk today.

To discuss how your business could benefit from setting up a company hub, email travelwestbusiness@bristol.gov.uk.

The Join My Journey poster. A purple and white background has cartoons of bikes, cars and people. Gold and White text reads: joinmyjourney Share your journeys with others to save Money and the Environment - Register at joinmyjourney.org.uk.

Qatar: Life, death, and football

Former Liverpool manager Bill Shankly is quoted as saying, “Some people believe football is a matter of life or death.” In Qatar, for thousands of migrant workers – it’s exactly that.

Migrant workers there are banned from joining trade unions. They have often had passports confiscated by employers, been left in massive debt by recruitment costs, and been left without basic protections.

6,500 south Asian migrant workers have died in Qatar in the decade since the hosting rights were awarded, reports the Guardian. Hundreds of thousands have faced human rights abuses, according to Amnesty International, who have called for a FIFA compensation fund of at least £350 million.

And, whether you’re Rovers or City, Bristol is united in the knowledge that Qatar got to host the World Cup thanks to a stitch-up. Sixteen of the people who voted on or were involved on a senior level in where to host this World Cup have been indicted, arrested, or banned from football/sport. Another eight have been accused or investigated. But, however many billions it cost Qatar to get the tournament, or build new stadia and infrastructure for it, the real price has been paid by migrant workers.

The English and Welsh FAs are both partnered with other European football associations to highlight human rights issues. At a tournament in a country where same-sex relationships are criminalised, Harry Kane will be among captains planning to wear ‘One Love’ armbands. England’s Three Lions Pride group are said to be boycotting the tournament, and YouGov found that 71% of Britons think it’s unacceptable for Qatar to host a major sporting event such as this.

At a time when our own national situation leaves us crying out for an escape, let alone the country’s favourite sport in the world’s biggest competition, the atmosphere feels at best fairly muted.

Of course, we’ll be supporting England – but, even if the men follow the women’s lead from the summer, football coming home again this winter would pale against the fact that so many workers won’t be.

We want your thoughts on the Council’s budget

Councillor Craig Cheney stands, smiling, with the trees of College Green behind him.
Today’s blog is from Councillor Craig Cheney, Deputy
Mayor for Finance, Governance, and Performance

Like many organisations, Bristol City Council has a cost of operating crisis, which will affect our ability to carry out all the activities we want to and may affect our ability to provide the services we want.

Over the next five years we must find a mix of additional income and cost savings between £37.5 million and £87.6 million, which equates to 9% to 20% of the council’s core budget. As part of our consultation on the annual budget which launches tomorrow (Friday 11 November), we’ll set our proposals for reducing costs and generating further income that amount to £46 million over the coming five years. With still some way to go to balance the worst-case five-year budget gap, further difficult decisions may be required in February 2023 and beyond to bridge the estimated £41 million gap remaining.

We’re not alone. The Local Government Association have estimated £3.4 billion in additional costs for councils in 2023/24, rising to £4.5 billion in 2024/25. Nine in ten councils nationally expect budget shortfalls next year and we’re no different.

How did we get here? This is a crisis that’s been over a decade in the making, with many years of austerity slashing council funding, with government support failing to keep pace with increasing costs and demand. In February this year, the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities approved its plans for funding local government for the following three years. It was a plan that meant councils would get an upfront amount of money to fund themselves for the period of the plan, based on the financial circumstances of the time. This was a plan that local government leaders agreed would result in real terms cuts for services and would result in financial difficulties for councils in years two and three.

Since the council passed its current budget and five-year outlook in March 2022, there have been significant changes on a national and global stage that are having a direct impact on the authority’s financial forecasts. Inflation in the UK has risen sharply in recent months, climbing above 10% in September this year, pushing up the price of goods, services and energy for everyone in the country. Global events, such as the invasion of Ukraine, are also having an effect on international markets which impact directly on the cost of living. These current issues add pressure onto a local government system that is already struggling under the pressure.

This consultation will set out the full scale of the challenge we face. It makes for uncomfortable reading in places but must be read by also recognising that our proposals are to ensure the budget is balanced and the finances exist to fund the vital work we’re doing. If we are to continue to meet our statutory obligations including providing housing, delivering care for the elderly and disabled, creating school places, and helping people through the cost-of-living crisis, we are going to have to be prepared to let go of some of the things we’ve fought hard to protect over the past six years.

Residents and businesses have the opportunity to share their view on this journey now and will also be asked for input during future consultations on some proposals that have yet to be fully worked up. I urge everyone to take part in this conversation to help inform our approach and the decision that needs to be taken in February next year.

Once live it will be available here: https://www.ask.bristol.gov.uk/budget-2023-24

Halloween marks the launch of Bristol Good Food Hub

This Halloween, Bristol is in for a treat: we can celebrate the launch of the Bristol Good Food Hub. The new online tool will help citizens and organisations find and access affordable and healthy food, cookery courses, and free child-friendly events and activities, alongside resources, news, and stories from around our city.

The hub, developed by Bristol Food Network with support of Bristol City Council, will bring together organisations and residents involved in Bristol’s thriving food scene to explore how we grow, buy, cook, eat and throw away food.

This has been made possible by The Bristol Good Food Partnership, a collection of organisations working together, behind the website, to deliver ambitious action plans which aim to make change across our whole local food system. Almost 30 organisations have helped develop the action plans including Feeding Bristol, Bristol Food Producers, University of Bristol, Resource Futures, Bristol Waste, The Community Farm, Square Food Foundation, Bristol Green Capital Partnership, and many more. Bristol Good Food is coordinated by Bristol Food Network, with the support of Bristol City Council.

The hub launches against the backdrop of the national cost-of-living crisis, with many people struggling with food insecurity and alongside the climate and ecological emergencies that we are tackling in our city. The hub focuses on making sure Bristol’s food systems work for communities, climate, and nature.

Food plays a key part of Bristol’s story and culture. It filled me with pride to see the unified city approach to getting food out to those who needed it during the pandemic. Seventy groups co-produced our Food Equality Strategy which was launched during Food Justice Week.

Our commitment to tackling food insecurity amongst young people is unwavering, and this half term we’re again providing vouchers to families that receive free school meals to help with school holiday hunger and rising living costs. We also continue to run our free Your Holiday Hub programme over the main school holidays where children attending are provided with nutritious meals and food education.

A photo of a pie with text reading: Bristol Gold Food City.

It was the collective bid from organisations and citizens that led to Bristol being the second UK city to win the Gold Food City award and the community groups that are growing peat-free vegetables and fruit to provide foodbanks from the Blaise Nursery plant donations.

Earlier this month, the Bristol Eating Better Award was relaunched and opened out to schools and early years settings across our city. This is part of our work towards ensuring more children have healthy, sustainable food.

Throughout October we’ve been encouraging citizens to try and choose low carbon foods, and dispose of food waste properly so it feels fitting to end the month with a celebration of the Bristol Good Food Hub. Please head on over to the hub and take a look at the latest news and events, and share your own food stories.

The butt stops here: preventing environmental crime

Gordon Brady, 3GS's Operations Manager, smiling.
Today’s guest blog is from Gordon Brady, Operations Manager at 3GS

3GS has been working alongside Bristol City Council, tackling environmental crimes in the city through the Clean Streets Enforcement campaign, to create measurably cleaner streets.

Officers have been patrolling the city every day to cut down on environmental crime and increase environmental awareness. when caught, perpetrators are given a fixed penalty notice on the spot. The cases of those who refuse to pay are transferred to the courts for prosecution, where they are usually required to pay a larger fine.

3GS officers working on behalf of the council have been patrolling the streets of Bristol since February 2019, and so far, have issued 16,000 fixed penalty notices, with over 3,000 cases that have either been taken to or are in the process of being taken to court.

The work our officers do in preventing environmental crime is vital for our city. The crime has an extremely negative impact on our streets and costs Bristol’s council taxpayers millions of pounds to clear up every year.

3GS officers regularly prosecute the perpetrators of avoidable environmental crimes across Bristol:

  • Dropping litter on the street or from your vehicle, including chewing gum and cigarette butts. Our officers have issued over 14,000 penalty notices to individuals dropping cigarettes.
  • Graffiti: this includes painting or damaging a tree or any road signs
  • Flyposting: officers have issued fines for over 500 examples of flyposting.
  • Fly tipping: a reckless and lazy act, that damages Bristol’s wildlife.
  • Public urination and spitting: our officers have dealt with 242 cases of spitting and 38 cases of public urination.
  • Nuisance parking: like vehicles for sale.
  • There are cases of individuals not putting their domestic or commercial waste out properly.
  • Breaches of a Community Protection Notice.
  • Breach of Public Space Protection Orders, such as not clearing up your dogs’ mess; not keeping your dog under control; taking a dog into an excluded area, such as an enclosed children’s play area; drinking in a no-drinking area.
Mayor Marvin Rees, taking part in the Clean Streets Campaign with Easton primary school.

While the progress towards curbing environmental crime has evidently been positive, our hard work continues.

Recently, to help provide a more attractive street scene, 3GS officers have taken on the role of assisting their council colleagues in the investigation and enforcement of the handling of waste by Bristol’s commercial businesses, under section 47 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

In addition to this, the council offers educational programmes designed to change attitudes towards environmental crime, such as litter picks and billboard campaigns that teach the benefits of a cleaner, safer environment.

As the council takes a closer look at how we can all improve our relationship with waste during national recycling week, we celebrate a partnership that has helped transform the environmental landscape of Bristol. Supporting in the crackdown on offenders who have been responsible for the environmental deterioration of the city.

New changes to outdoor hospitality

Expanded outdoor hospitality has been a welcome addition across Bristol in response to the pandemic. It has supported local businesses and added more colour, vibrancy, and atmosphere to the streets. Many of us have enjoyed a meal or drink while sitting out in the city over the past couple of years. However, there are a number of national changes to how businesses can operate outdoors as we move beyond the pandemic.

Hospitality and the broader night time economy support the employment of a third of our workforce – more than 91,000 people. During the pandemic, there was an incredible response from the hospitality sector to adapt to changes, particularly those around outside dining, and our council rightly took a flexible approach to help support this.

We were able to do this because of legislation that was introduced by government which allowed councils to use temporary Traffic Regulation Orders (TROs) to support outdoor hospitality, permitting structures and furniture to be set up in parking bays. Disappointingly, the government chose not to renew this legislation and it has now expired. Outdoor hospitality can still be facilitated but permissions will now need to be sought.

We understand how frustrating this is for many businesses, particularly at a time when the sector is being hit hard by inflation alongside the wider impact of the cost of living crisis. We want to support businesses to continue to operate outdoors where we can, and we want to ensure businesses are clear on what they need to do next.

On streets that have been pedestrianised or are covered by traffic orders — such as Princess Victoria Street, the Old City, Cotham Hill, and King Street — businesses with existing outside structures should apply for retrospective planning permission. If granted, then they can then apply for a structures licence and pavement licence to place furniture on the highway outside their premises. In these areas, any existing structures can remain while going through this process and no enforcement action will be taken during that time.

On all other streets, structures and furniture must be removed. Planning permission can still be applied for but we cannot legally allow existing structures to remain in the interim due to the change in national legislation set out above.

We support reclaiming road space for people, where we can. By making the policies around this more robust, we can ensure outdoor hospitality structures add value and are suitable for their surroundings, and that any structures or furniture in the road are safe and don’t impact accessibility.

Getting the relevant permissions can be a complex process as this may require approval from up to three separate regimes: Planning, Highways (for structures and pavement licences), and Licensing (for alcohol licenses). Communication with businesses has sought to set this out as simply as possible, but I recognise how confusing this can be for business owners who have so many other concerns, which is why we will be producing an overarching guidance document that explains the process clearly.

Thank you again to Bristol’s businesses for working with us on this. I encourage anyone who is unclear about what this means for them to get in touch with our business team by emailing business@bristol.gov.uk

Bristol in New York: cities that never sleep on the SDGs

Working for the interests of Bristol means being committed to getting stuff done within the city’s boundaries. But it also means shaping the national and international context in which we work. Simply, we must think globally and act locally. National and international policy and global events directly affect Bristol’s residents every day, and we are a globally connected city. Bristol has a leadership responsibility not just to work for our own good, but for that of our country and our planet.

Last month, I accepted an invitation to attend Global Goals Week alongside the United Nations General Assembly in New York city to represent Bristol. The wider trip further supported the Council’s international strategy: promoting trade; continuing working with other cities ahead of COP27; and supporting Bristol organisations’ international ambitions.

Global Goals Week is an annual week of action, awareness, and accountability: a shared commitment between hundreds of partners across civil society, business, universities, and the UN to accelerate the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). They recognise that social and environmental justice must go hand-in-hand. The SDGs are 17 interdependent goals for sustainable development, with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling the climate emergency and working to preserve our natural environments.

Bristol has been on the forefront of the SDG movement among cities. We were the first city in the UK, and one of the first three cities in the world, to undertake a Voluntary Local Review. We have mapped the SDGs into Bristol’s One City Plan and the Council’s Corporate Strategy, and ensure that all developers know that it is our aim not just to measure ourselves against the SDGs but to deliver them. This international reputation is one of the reasons I was invited to New York.

We have led on the argument that delivery of the SDGs will not succeed if left to national governments alone, but must be driven through cities. I spoke at the 17 Rooms (a partnership between the Centre for Sustainable Development at Brookings and The Rockefeller Foundation) flagship summit and attended the UN General Assembly ‘Business as Usual’ discussion.

At the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Goalkeepers event, I represented Bristol alongside Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, the Mayor of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Yvonne and I have been key to the growing awareness of the need to get finance and resource into the hands of city leaders, so that we can deliver futures that are both more just and more sustainable.

I also attended the Emmerson Collective’s launch of the Climate Migration Council, as the spokesperson for local government. Participants from every continent discussed how we are going to take on the growing challenge of climate-driven migration, with the prospect of 150 million climate-driven migrants by the middle of this century. This will mean minimising the climate push factors of migration, but also require national governments to work in partnership with cities and civil society to look at the world’s migration framework with a view to providing climate-driven migrants with a proper legal status.

I met with Eric Adams, the new Mayor of New York City. We talked about the standing that he has, as the Mayor of New York, one of the world’s most prominent cities, to advance the voice and influence of the world’s cities at COP27 next month. We also discussed further strengthening Bristol’s ties with New York, one of the world’s biggest city economies, and work that we can both do as Mayors of African heritage to reach out to Mayors on the African continent and around the world to support just and sustainable development.

I met with our government and business representatives, including Visit Britain, in the United States. In my meeting with the consul general and her team, we talked about investment opportunities across Bristol, and the other Core Cities. We talked about our ground-breaking City Leap partnership, securing over £424 million of initial investment from American and Swedish companies for clean energy infrastructure in Bristol. I also shared information about 3Ci, of which we are a founding member, following on from their investment conference in Bristol last month. 3Ci have identified around £330 billion of investment opportunities across our country. We also talked about how to further promote Bristol’s tourism offer in the world’s largest economy, as a base for the woe and beyond, with the opportunities that come with the significance of Bristol 650: the 650th anniversary of our city being granted county status by Edward III, which we look forward to marking next year.

Thanks to our strong international relationships and growing reputation as a global city, partner organisations kindly covered the costs of my outbound and return travel and accommodation. My diary for September is published on Bristol City Council’s website.

Deanfield Outdoor Centre celebrates 50 years as an education provider

Young person leaping onto the zip wire at Deanfield Outdoor Centre

Located in the beautiful Forest of Dean, Deanfield Outdoor Centre is a residential outdoor education centre, which is owned and operated by Bristol City Council’s Trading with Schools service. Since first opening its doors in September 1972, Deanfield has welcomed over 175,000 young people who have participated in outdoor activities and courses at the centre.

In early September, Deanfield celebrated its fiftieth anniversary with an event on site. Schools were invited along to the celebratory event along with other guests and current and former staff of Deanfield Outdoor Centre. Richard Hanks, Director of Education and Skills at Bristol City Council unveiled a standing stone to commemorate the centre’s fiftieth anniversary. A time capsule was also buried beside the stone for future generations of young people to discover.

The group standing by the standing stone as they celebrate 50 years of Deanfield Outdoor Centre.

As well as celebrating 50 years, the event also aimed to showcase the extensive activities and fantastic facilities that Deanfield has to offer. School children were encouraged to sample some of the activities including the zip wire, climbing tower, leap of faith, tunnels system and bushcraft.

I know how important it is for young people to get to experience nature. Being able to explore more of the world was a key experience of my own youth growing up in Bristol. For many young people growing up in cities, access to nature can be scarce, Deanfield Outdoor Centre does incredible work in making these experiences more widely accessible.

The environment is at the heart of Deanfield’s education programme as well as teaching about the benefits of outdoor activity. Being in the Forest of Dean, Deanfield incorporates its surroundings to create educational programmes centred around nature. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a huge impact on our mental and physical wellbeing and many children have become even more disconnected from nature than ever before. The work that Deanfield does is instrumental in providing young people with a safe environment to build confidence and learn new skills in the outdoors. Young people are encouraged to experience and learn about their environment through activities such as bushcraft and orienteering.

Deanfield Outdoor Centre House, the building is covered in green moss.
Deanfield Outdoor Centre

The centre also caters for families during the summer and corporate groups throughout the year. Ground floor accommodation is fully accessible, and activities can be catered for young people with special educational needs and disabilities.

If you would like to find out more about Deanfield Outdoor Centre, please visit our website, or contact Deanfield Outdoor Centre directly on dfsc@bristol.gov.uk.

Better Lives at Home – a new journey at Addison Apartments

Councillor Helen Holland, smiling.
Today’s guest blog is from Councillor Helen Holland, cabinet member for Adult Social Care and Integrated Care System

Supporting young people who are autistic or have physical or learning disabilities to live independently is so important. I recently visited Bristol City Council’s new and innovative Addison Apartments in North Bristol which reaffirmed this for me.

The development of five, affordable homes at Addison Apartments, Sea Mills features fully adapted, self-contained flats designed to meet the housing and support needs of young people with complex physical and learning disabilities. The apartments, completed by the council’s Housing Delivery Team in partnership with Adult Social Care services, enable young people to live as independently as possible, in the right environment adapted to meet their individual needs.

Three of the new apartments are now home to three young people. They are homes for life, with no end of tenancy – the choice to move rests with the tenants and their families. Delivered as part of the council’s Better Lives at Home programme and offered at affordable social rent levels, the apartments offer so much more than a roof over the heads of these young people. They are specially designed to maximise tenants’ independence and offer easy access to local shops, parks and transport links. It’s anticipated the final two tenants will move in by the end of the year.

The tour group, including Cllr Helen Holland and Cllr Donald Alexander stand in the garden of Addison apartments. Behind them is the apartment.
Addison Apartments

During the tour with local ward Councillor Donald Alexander we saw the many features in the apartments that support residents’ needs. This includes the state-of-the-art nurse call systems, which residents can use to urgently alert onsite staff if they need help, these also link to emergency and detection devices. There are also specialist, adaptable kitchens and bathrooms, and an integrated track and hoist system throughout each apartment. The communal lounge and kitchen area encourage residents to socialise, while the beautiful communal gardens will undoubtedly be a popular feature and play a part in enabling people with disabilities to live well in their community. Councillor Alexander is also working with local community organisations to offer opportunities to these new Sea Mills residents.

The kitchen of Addison Apartments.
Inside the kitchen of Addison Apartments

Milestones, a local care and support provider, operate the buildings and have a 24/7 presence, offering residents reassurance that help is on hand should they need it. This is a strong example of a fantastic partnership with a shared vision.

I’m incredibly proud of this initiative, which is already making a huge difference to some Bristol residents, who are most in need of our support, and will be a model we hope to copy elsewhere in the city in future.