Category Archives: Learning, Skills, and Young People

Greening schools, inside and out

On the left is Councillor Nicola Beech, Cabinet member for Climate, Ecology, Waste and Energy. On the right is Councillor Don Alexander, cabinet member for transport.
Today’s blog is from Councillor Nicola Beech, Cabinet member for Climate, Ecology, Waste and Energy, and Councillor Don Alexander, Cabinet member for Transport,

With young people’s voices playing a key role in tackling the climate emergency, we have made greening schools a top priority for our administration. Their enthusiasm can clearly be seen in Bristol Youth Council’s Environment and Transport group survey results, which recorded over 1,300 responses from young people keen to promote sustainable transport. Listening and developing their ideas is key to setting up future generations for success, and we will continue to work with young people towards a better and more sustainable Bristol.

We were the first city to declare an Ecological Emergency. Since then, we have focused on delivering ambitious green policies and goals, such as setting a ground-breaking goal of becoming carbon neutral and climate resilient city by 2030. We know this is an ambitious challenge and will involve the action of everyone in the city, including our schools.

Our Schools Energy Efficiency Scheme has helped support local schools to cut carbon over the last 3 years. We have invested £1.3 million in 30 schools and this will save a staggering 6,320 tonnes of carbon emissions over the next 10 years, equivalent to 1,150 homes’ electricity use for one year. This has complemented our work connecting our schools to Bristol’s Heat Network, a £6.9 million project which provides local businesses, organisations, and housing with heat and power from more sustainable sources.

Oasis Community Learning, and their partner, Eden Sustainable, have done some fantastic work towards our shared goals. Oasis John Williams, their school in Hengrove, has recently installed 408 solar panels on the roof, which will produce free electricity and help support Bristol becoming a carbon neutral city by 2030.

Mayor of Bristol, Marvin Rees visiting the newly installed solar panels with the student from Oasis Academy
Visit to Oasis Academy

Equally, it has been gratifying to see the enthusiasm across the city for the Bristol School Streets pilots, which have not only been designed to reduce the volume of traffic around school gates, but also to improve the air quality around schools as we work with communities towards Liveable Neighbourhood schemes.

We work with schools to encourage sustainable lifestyles and reduce vehicle traffic through a range of options. This includes ‘Bikeability‘ training for pupils, setting up park and strides, providing parking buddies to help keep the school entrances clear, providing signage such as ‘Show you care, park elsewhere’ and delivering road safety education.

We know that the challenges that face us in terms of living more sustainably will be there for years to come. Therefore, we want to build long-term, sustainable solutions. That’s why we have also been encouraging schools to get students involved in developing their own ideas for being greener, such as installing smart meters or turning waste into wildlife habitats. One example of this is the Bristol Education Partnership Climate Challenge, which brings together schools with colleges and universities to address the climate crisis.

So as we look to the year ahead for our schools, we would like to thank them for their engagement as we move towards our goal of carbon neutrality. Through changes to the curriculum, travel, and building infrastructure, they are helping us to take significant steps forward as a city – and setting a brilliant example while doing it.

International Youth Day – a voice for young people

Today’s blog is from John Wayman and Alice Towle, Bristol’s Youth Mayors. Both John and Alice also sit on the Bristol Youth Council, representing north and east-central Bristol respectively, and were elected in 2019 through the Bristol Big Youth Vote.

This year’s International Youth Day comes at perhaps a sobering moment when considering the future (and for many the present) of today’s young people. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s damning report concerning humanity’s destructive impact on the climate once again reminds us that this generation seems to have been born into a world on fire, both literally and metaphorically. Indeed, to avert disaster, action needs to be taken on multiple fronts by both current leaders and young people.

The transformation of food systems, the theme of this year’s International Youth Day, certainly constitutes a key aspect of our global response to the climate crisis given the significance of both food production and food transport to global greenhouse gas emissions. It will require the aid and input of young people to ensure we strike a balance between radically transforming food systems to remove their impact on the climate and maintaining food security to avoid disastrous consequences of another kind.

What has the Youth Council been up to?

In a world more globalised than ever before, as both the climate crisis and the covid-19 pandemic have thrown into stark relief, making global connections has been more important than ever before. This need for collaboration is the reason that we started the International Youth Mayors’ Association (IYMA) , a group of young leaders from five countries (and growing) who meet every month to discuss best practice and the various youth issues we face, both similar and different. Past topics have included how to set up youth mayors, youth involvement in environmental politics, and different countries’ political systems. Although we are a relatively new organisation, we hope to expand our membership and grow into a group that can represent both the unity and diversity of young people around the world.

However, although taking action on an international level is important, local action remains crucial. For instance, active travel brings benefits to both the environment and to students’ mental and physical health. That is why the Youth Council’s Environment and Transport group have been running a project centred on encouraging young people to walk and cycle to school. Earlier this year we launched a survey hoping to identify the primary barriers that stop young people from walking or cycling to school. The survey was immensely successful. We had over 1,300 responses from around the city and now we aim to run a series of focus groups to brainstorm solutions to the barriers identified by the survey. Hopefully the views of the city’s young people will be able to meaningfully shape its transport policies.

Although the looming threat of climate change combined with the immense uncertainty of covid-19 may present a bleak reality facing today’s young people, there is still hope for the future. With young people sharing their voices and leaders acting on them, perhaps a fairer and more resilient world can be built.

Dementia-friendly allotments in Bristol

To mark the start of National Allotment Week, today’s guest blog is from Isobel Jones, CEO of Alive, a charity working to enrich the lives of older people in Bristol and around the country. I recently visited their dementia-friendly allotment in Brentry with Councillor Helen Holland, Cabinet Member for Adult Social Care.

Isobel Jones, CEO of Alive, pictured at Brentry's dementia friendly allotment

We all know how being outside can lift our spirits. Working outdoors surrounded by nature, nurturing fruit and vegetables or just sitting in the garden can bring a smile to our faces and help us relax after a difficult day. Allotments are incredible spaces for escaping from the normality and stress of our busy lives. They provide us with a real sense of achievement when we harvest crops we’ve tended from day one (and at times a sense of frustration when the cabbages get eaten again!)   

For those who live with dementia, gardening can be a source of joy and achievement. Maintaining physical activity, cognitive function and social interaction all help someone living with dementia to remain stimulated and to feel valued and helpful.

However, accessing gardens and allotments can become more challenging as dementia progresses. 

So, when the idea of developing and running an allotment for people living with dementia was suggested to us, we jumped at it.  We were already facilitating regular gardening sessions for groups in care settings across the city and through them witnessing the joy and satisfaction they brought to many older people. But we also wanted to provide a space for people living in the community to experience the benefits of horticultural therapy. 

Mayor Marvin Rees visiting Brentry's dementia-friendly allotment, pictured with a volunteer from BRACE Dementia Research

We were handed the keys to plot 18A at Charlton Road allotments in Brentry in March 2019. The  ground hadn’t been cultivated for about four years and was overgrown, unloved and close to being unworkable. However, my incredible team of volunteers and staff have put hours of love and hard work into the plot and have transformed it into the most magical, peaceful and calming space.

We’ve also put in a compost loo, a large social shed, accessible beds and lots of seating so we can meet all needs and garden in all weathers. It has been a real community effort, with support from local funders, businesses, fellow allotment plot holders and a sizeable team of volunteers, who have all supported us in our vision to enable those affected by dementia to have access to the outdoors and feel the sense of achievement and purpose that comes from “growing their own”.  

We are proud to say the Alive allotment is now fully open and is running regular supported sessions for people living with dementia and their carers. Participants can choose what they do there; they can come and potter about on personal projects, work with a volunteer, or just sit and have a cup of tea and chat. We are already seeing the positive outcomes on people’s wellbeing and are looking forward to seeing the groups grow.

We need to ensure there are more opportunities like this for those affected by dementia. In the words of one of our service users,  “Gardening, it’s almost medical. They need things like this to keep people going.” We couldn’t agree more. 

Bristol’s award-winning young carer

Today’s guest blog is from Hanna Sampson, recipient of the Diana Award, who has done some fantastic work raising awareness for young carers.

I’m Hanna Sampson and I am a young carer for my autistic sister. I can’t actually remember when I first started caring for her, but I was first labelled as a young carer back in 2017 after an assessment from Bristol and South Gloucestershire young carers. Since then, I have been an advocate for young carers’ needs.

I attended Young Carers Voice, a monthly group where we would discuss issues that young carers face and tackle them. Through this, I was given amazing opportunities to raise awareness. Together we have created two films: ‘Who cares in school?’ Which focuses on young carers in school and ‘My mental health project’ which focuses on our own mental health needs as young carers.

The ‘Who cares in schools’ film led to a 130% increase in school registering to young carers programmes. I also gave a teacher training assembly and two whole school assemblies about young carers with the hope of setting up a young carers group at my own school but unfortunately received little to no support. Again, this was also a common experience.

I have also had the pleasure of going to Parliament with other young carers across the country to talk to MPs about the needs of young carers. I have given numerous seminars and workshops to health professionals, worked on the 15-step programme at University Hospitals Bristol and Weston, and helped develop the Bristol City Council Young Carers Strategy.

This year was my last year at the young carers service and I was honoured with the Diana Award for all my work with them. It feels so amazing to be recognised in such a prestigious way, especially as this year would have marked her 60th Birthday.

Unfortunately, due to the pandemic, the ceremony was online but it was still fantastic and had special guests celebrating the recipients, including the Duke of Sussex! Princess Diana is a true inspiration to us all, a reminder that anyone has the power to change the world and it is a true honour to be recognised in her legacy.

Bedminster Lantern Parade

Today’s guest blog is from Ade Williams, chair of the Bedminster Winter Lantern Parade and Superintendent Pharmacist at Bedminster Pharmacy.

There is great power in togetherness, celebrating each other’s contribution to a joint endeavour. Yet as a society, we are faced with ever-present reminders that our communities are unfairly divided. Sadly the age at which we first experience this only continues to get younger, shattering something that is forever lost.

Over the last 18 months, many of us have discovered an awakened desire to see positive changes in our society. Sadly life with all its demands will start to rob us of the chance to pursue those changes. Do you remember saying, “When this is over, I will not go back to the old ways?”

Ade Williams, Chair of the Bedminster Winter Lantern Parade

Bedminster Winter Lantern Parade has launched a fundraising appeal to raise the £15,000 needed to deliver the tenth anniversary extravaganza, South Bristol’s biggest Winter event. As Chair of the organising steering group, I know a lot about the dedication and work of delivering this event. All the volunteers, artists, teachers, and sponsors that support children across our community express themselves, showcase, and celebrate their work together.

One of the core values of the Parade is that it is proactively inclusive. Children from the nine schools involved represent the ever-increasing rich diversity of our South Bristol communities. Some even over-representing the racial diversity and socio-economic profiles across our shared City.

One of the event’s ambitions is to tackle why some children create lanterns in school but do not participate in the Parade. We feel this is very important. Working with friends and peers to create something exciting must be matched with the joy and thrill of showcasing it. Suppose many more young people can see how much the community loves and appreciates them; the potential fruits of such life experiences can be transformational.

The Parade’s link to better health and wellbeing is an added bonus. Art and creativity are positive health and wellbeing influencers. Collective effort and volunteering increase self-worth while walking the length of the Parade will reduce your blood pressure, burn calories and increase your heart rate — likewise for dancing. As for dancing to the rhythm of the music, you have an expressive licence.

The Bedminster Lantern Parade is a transformational event. Your much needed financial support and contributions enrich our community, sowing seeds to produce a healthier, inclusive, equitable society. Building that better future is the collective effort linking us all together.

Join us here: https://www.lanternparade.org/

Levelling up

The Prime Minister has today set out his ambitions for ‘levelling up’, with the stated aims of improving services and boosting community pride across the UK, seeking to create a more balanced economy. We agree with the ambition to give everyone the chance of a good job on decent pay, and are determined to make Bristol a true Living Wage City – where poverty pay is a thing of the past. Increasing access to opportunity no matter where you live is at the heart of our approach in Bristol and something we should all be working towards as a country.

Levelling up will only be successful if it targets those living in deprivation –  it is vital that ‘levelling up’ policy impacts the communities and groups that need it most.

We encourage Government to focus on the challenges of poverty, social mobility, inequalities, and on the groups most affected by these challenges, that the pandemic has further entrenched. If Government takes too much of a blunt, North versus South approach, those poorer communities, often hidden and invisible across our country and in our major cities, will continue to miss out and get left even further behind.

Bristol is an example of this complexity. We have a fantastic story to tell – a £15 billion economy with sectors of high growth and opportunity. And yet we are one of the most unequal cities in England with six areas in the top 1% most deprived in the UK and 20% of our children at risk of hunger every day. Writing off deprivation in Bristol just because we live further south than, say, Birmingham, would only see more Bristolians fall further south of the poverty line.

The last thing we need is for regions or areas to be set against each other, dictated by competitive funding pots from Whitehall, which inevitably will result in the very people who stand to benefit the most missing out. In recent years, that Bingo-style approach has set hungry children in Bristol against hungry children in Plymouth, and pitted homeless people in Bristol against homeless people in Manchester: for the Prime Minister’s pledge for ‘levelling up’ to be ‘win-win’, we need fundamental change.

What is required is a national approach that recognises that our focus is addressing the big challenges of the day – including the climate and ecological emergencies – in a way which takes all communities forward and provides ample opportunities for everyone.

The Prime Minister  emphasised the role of local leadership as part of ‘levelling up’ places. What local leaders need the most is predictable funding that best enables ourselves and city partners, like our local NHS, charities, and businesses, to come together around long-term plans. The UK is one of the most heavily centralised countries in Europe – that has been known for far longer than I have been Mayor, and even before Boris Johnson was one. For ‘levelling up’ to be truly effective, I would urge Government to release more funding to local places, then step back and help create the space for us to take the opportunities we know we can deliver.

School Streets: Protecting Bristol’s children

Today’s guest blog is from Councillor Helen Godwin, Cabinet Member for Women and Families and Children’s Services.

Councillor Helen Godwin

Yesterday’s announcement that Councillor Don Alexander has joined Mayor Rees’s cabinet is great news for the city, and great news for me as I look forward to working with Don to deliver one of our key priorities: permanent School Streets across the city.

School Streets involve short-term daily street closures outside schools during drop-off and pick-up times — the benefits are multiple from both an air quality and road safety perspective; and are particularly welcome given the current challenges around social distancing at school gates.

Bristol School Streets aims to:

  • reduce the volume of traffic around school gates
  • improve road safety for pupils
  • encourage more children to walk, scoot or cycle to school
  • improve the air quality and environment at the school gates making it a more pleasant space for everyone

The concept of School Streets comes from Italy, who first introduced them in 1989, but the first local authority in England was the London Borough of Camden in 2017. Since then several local authorities, including Bristol, have set up their own schemes, many of others opting for temporary schemes as part of their covid-19 emergency response.

In Bristol, we have been working on our own School Streets project since 2019. We want to work towards permanent schemes that have a direct impact on the schools and their surrounding communities, building towards our Liveable Neighbourhoods: safe communities where everyone can travel cleanly and safely with less through-traffic.

We currently have School Streets pilots running at four schools in the city with a further four planned for the next academic year. We have taken the decision to consult closely with both the schools, residents and the school communities to make sure that we get these schemes right and that wider communities feel included, listened to, and ultimately feel the benefit of schemes that work for everyone.

As Don will tell us; transport regulations and traffic flows are complicated – and as much as we would like to, we cannot implement schemes overnight. We have developed a matrix to ensure we look at factors including traffic flow, air quality, other road safety measures as well as the broader context of the school community, as we prioritise the roll out of the scheme.

School Streets is a really important project that demonstrates our commitment to better air quality and streets free of traffic, but it also brings children and young people to the forefront of our response to the Climate Emergency and to our work on improving Bristol’s infrastructure to ensure that our city works for everyone.

Councillor Don Alexander was appointed to Cabinet this week to lead on Transport issues

Remembering two of Bristol’s best Black creatives

Today’s guest blog is from Councillor Asher Craig, Deputy Mayor for Communities, Equalities, and Public Health.

Councillor Asher Craig

Just a few days apart, the city has lost two of its ground-breaking artistic black creatives: Barrington Anderson, co-founder of the brilliant award-winning Ekome National Dance Company, and Reynold Duncan, founder and Director of Arts Opportunity Theatre (fondly known as AOT). I send my heartfelt condolences to their friends and family at this difficult time.

Barry Anderson

Barry Anderson

Barry was instrumental in the development of African arts in the UK, not just Bristol.  A dancer since the age of nine, he specialised in Ghanaian dance for over 20 years.  He arrived with his family from Jamaica at the age of six and settled in St Pauls.  In a society full of poverty and problems, dancing gave Barry a means of expression, a sense of his roots and a profession.  His legacy continues with members of his family, led by his sister Angela Anderson, continuing to bring Afrikan Dance to the masses.

Barry’s Thanksgiving and Celebration of Life was held this week. It was befitting that Barry’s ancestral journey should begin with a Drum Call which followed the casket from his home in St Pauls to St Mary Redcliffe Church.

Reynold Duncan

Reynold Duncan

Reynold was born in Guyana and was a musician.  In the early 1980s he established Arts Opportunity Theatre in Bristol (also known as AOT).  AOT helped hundreds of young unemployed people from all communities across Bristol under the then Manpower Services Commission’s  “Youth Opportunities Programme (YOP)”.  Many of whom went on to achieve great careers and success in the creative and performing arts.  These included drama, dance, music, stage management, lighting, photography, video-editing, costume design and making, creative and journalistic writing, graphic design, electrical and electronic engineering, office administration, booking, and computer skills.  His contribution is legendary and he laid the foundations for what has become one of Bristol’s greatest strengths as a creative and artistic city. 

I had the opportunity of working for AOT in the 1980s.  Reynold appointed me as the Chief Administrator at AOT.  I  joined the company when they were in the middle of rehearsing for their show, Black & White in Colour. This was was followed by the musical play Freedom City – which played at the Little Theatre in Bristol – and Romeo & Juliet in Dub, all of which toured throughout the UK including Edinburgh Fringe Festival where they received rave reviews. 

Plans for Reynold’s funeral are being finalised, but one thing that I know is both Barry and Reynold will receive the send off they deserve and their legacy in our city needs to be both celebrated and remembered by all.

Annual Address 2021

This is the transcript for my Annual Address speech I delivered at Full Council on Tuesday 6 July 2021.

As this is my first opportunity since being elected, I will start with some thanks:

  1. to the mayoral and councillor candidates who took on the challenge of running for office.
  2. to those of you who turned out to vote irrespective of who you voted for. Participation is essential to our democracy.
  3. and of course to those who campaigned and voted for me.

While my wife has been on TV admitting that she sometimes wishes I wasn’t the Mayor (a view a number of my Twitter trolls and probably one or two elected members hold all the time), it is nonetheless a profound honour to be re-elected on our record.

We laid out an ambitious agenda to the city in 2016. Bristol didn’t have a reputation for delivery and wanted a leadership that would get things done.

They voted for a bigger picture, for a vision of an inclusive, sustainable and fairer city committed to tackling the poverty and inequalities that undermined us. They voted for affordable homes, for jobs and for hope.

I don’t often quote Cllr Hopkins but he did once share with me – with all of us actually because it was in Full Council – that it’s easy to get elected, but the real test is to be re-elected. Having faced that test, we are confident the city wants us to continue to deliver ambition and compassion.

The election taught us all a lot:

  1. The city is changing – and certain areas are seeing dramatic changes in population and culture.
  2. We face the threat of growing divides – the old ones such as race, class, health, education, earnings. And new ones such as home ownership versus non-ownership, and those who have some trust in public institutions verses those who have none.
  3. We take our planetary responsibilities seriously.

The election also taught us that the conflicts and controversies, the shambles and scandals, worked up in this organisation and the way they are managed and driven through social media are often worlds away from the immediate challenges and complicated problems real people are facing in Bristol.

And we learned the people of Bristol are not interested in the weeds of the council. They want solutions to the problems they face every day, not abstract negativity, opposition for opposition’s sake. They want us to be a source of hope.

The people of Bristol don’t see the world in binary. Talking to so many people during the election:

  1. they appreciated the commitments on housing delivery but also understood the challenges that Brexit and Covid had presented in maintaining the levels of delivery.
  2. they appreciated the need to protect land for nature and tackle climate change but also the need to build homes for people a grow the economy for jobs.
  3. on Colston’s statue, many appreciated the need to tackle racism alongside a sense that the statue was important and symbolic. But they also appreciated the statue itself was not the solution to racism. Some held a fear that they were losing their history and some recognise the danger of ordinary people being manipulated by those who, for lack of any real political vision, revert to manipulating them in the culture wars.

There is are enough challenges and divisions in the world without us conjuring up new ones for whatever motivation.

People want us to be focussed on creating hope and delivery and a better city. They want us to be people who are able to wrestle with the complex challenges and contradictions that cities – in all their diversity – embody.

I will spend the next three years leading in three areas:

  1. Inclusion
  2. Sustainability
  3. Delivery

1. Inclusion means inclusive growth

It means jobs and homes in a diverse economy that offers pathways to employment for people at all skills and education levels.

Our challenge is to share a way of doing economic development that by its very nature redresses the historic and institutional drivers of inequality and social immobility. This rather than growing the economy and then tacking a couple of equalities initiatives on the back end.

2. Sustainability means delivering against the climate action plan and the ecological action plan

It means working as a council. But it also means working as a city doing all we can to decarbonise the energy, transport and food systems on which our cities depends. It means not dealing with any single issue in isolation but recognising the interdependence of poverty, class, racism and climate change.

On that front, I will share the insight of someone who recently gave a speech to a Multi-Faith meeting on the environment that was organised by Afzal Shah. He shared with a gathering of black, white and Asian Christians, Muslims, Sikhs, Hindus and Jews how too often environmentalism had been a voice of divisive and accusational politics when what it should have been a cause for unity in the face of a global challenge.

We need to hear that challenge.

Sustainability means not shying away from the housing crisis and the difficult conversations about density and sustainable city centre locations.

It means bringing investment into green jobs and a transition to a low carbon economy.

3. Delivery means continuing to get stuff done

Delivery means lives change. Homes are built. Children are fed. Women and girls no longer in period poverty. Ground source and water source heat pumps and installed. Schools are built. City areas are pedestrianised. Jobs are generated. Homeless people are housed.

You can measure action by the number of cranes on the horizon. They are a clear example of the modernisation of the city, of continuing growth and opportunity.

Delivery means continuing to work as a city, not just a council. Working with partners and continuing to meet city challenges with all partners, cleaner air, a living wage city, mass transit, a living rent city, a city where diversity of thought leads modern 21st century city and continuing to put cities at the forefront of political, economic and social challenges – putting cities in front of challenges where governments fail.

We have the challenge of leading a city that is growing in size of population, need, diversity and inequality within the same geographical area of land. We do this while facing up to the environmental, economic, political, social and moral need to face up to tackle the climate and ecological crisis. And sometimes the things we must do to meet one area of these challenges can threaten to undermine our efforts to meet another.

Conclusion

So I finish with the same offer I have always made: if you have an genuine offer, a contribution to make to our efforts to meet those challenges, if you want to turn up with solutions, the door is open. Come make that offer, and then tell me what you need from the city to enable you to deliver it.

The time I have as mayor is loaned to me by the city. It’s my job to invest it not in fruitless distractions and false politics, but in the people and initiatives that will make a difference for the city, our country and world.

The case for food education

Today’s guest blog comes from Barny Haughton, Founder, Director and Cookery Teacher at Square Food Foundation, based in The Park, Knowle.

Photo credit: Sustainable Food Trust

If we want healthy and resilient communities and healthy and resilient food systems, we need a food educated society. And that means getting food education into schools and into the community.

Most people in the developed world are not responsible for and have no say in any aspect of the food system except eating – and maybe – cooking it. Food ‘education’ and the responsibility for how food is produced from soil to plate has been the default remit of the food industry.

But we are finally discovering the real significance of where our food comes and why some foods are better for the environment than others and about the relationship between diet and physical and mental health. We are discovering that learning how to cook well is often the first step to eating well. And that learning how to cook is a gateway to a world of knowledge, confidence and empowerment beyond just a life skill and healthier eating. It connects individuals, families and communities in the most obvious and brilliant ways. It brings an understanding about the bigger food landscape and our place in it. 

So now is the time to look beyond the kitchen and at the bigger picture. Covid-19 has shown on the one hand the fragility of a globally evolved and globally dependent food system and on the other the potential for local communities to transition towards systems which are less fragile, more responsive – and systems which are understood by, and the responsibility of, ordinary people.

Food education in schools…

Imagine what a generation of school leavers who had learned about the world of food would contribute towards this transition

What would food studies in schools mean?

Food education is not just about cooking and nutrition

It means the study of everything to do with food:

  • Agriculture, production, climate, environment, natural history
  • History, tradition, politics, law, economics,
  • Culture, religion, ethics
  • Science, ecology, waste, medicine, disease
  • Identity, literature, art
  • Public health, nutrition, diet, personal health
  • Cooking, taste, eating, tradition

And in the community…

For the past ten years Square Food Foundation has been delivering cookery and food education programmes to people from all walks of life. I have personally been working in food education for the past thirty years. And I absolutely know that it is a critical part of the solution to the challenges which face us all – in our communities and in the world. Square Food is currently working in partnership with Oasis Connaught Primary School in Knowle West on a whole school curriculum integrated food education project which involves teachers, parents, whole families as well as the children. Schools and community working together.

We believe that food education is key to the principles of social democracy and food systems resilience and that it should be central to education itself, to the life of every school, on the national curriculum, in the minds of government policy makers.

Without food education we will never substantially reduce food poverty. And with it we can solve many of the biggest problems facing humanity.

Imagine an Environment Minister with a Masters in Gastronomic Sciences

It’s time to get food education into schools, into the community and into government policy.

If you would like to find out more about the work and aims of the Square Food Foundation you can contact them via:

Info@squarefoodfoundation.co.uk

0117 903 9780

Insta: @SquareFoodFoundation

Twitter: @squarefood

Facebook: @squarefoodfoundation