Tag Archives: Bristol

Building a better Bristol

Bristol is a rapidly growing city. One of the fastest growing areas in England and Wales, our population has grown by 10% in the last decade. We need to work together to make sure that Bristol grows well, with local communities benefiting from the change happening on their doorstep. Regeneration will bring city-wide benefits so that everyone can thrive.

To ensure these changes are as positive as possible, we have a vision to create vibrant communities with sustainable, inclusive economic growth. Quality affordable homes and job opportunities will be in locations where we can have reliable, frequent public transport connections and be within walking and cycling routes.

As I shared at last month’s State of the City Address, we are elected to shape the city and the outcomes we want for it. The changes coming for Bristol cannot be left to the chances of a developer aligning with an out-of-date Local Plan and a quasi-judicial process. So, we work to push the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, affordability targets, mixed tenures, modern methods of construction, and active frontages. We want to make sure the changes happen as coherently as possible. It’s essential we work in partnership with landowners, developers, and local communities, to create development frameworks which will set out the principles that will guide and inform how change will take place in an area.  

A map of Bristol with highlighted areas showing regeneration projects across the city. Western Harbour is highlighted pink, Bedminster Green is highlighted green, Southmead is blue, City Centre is purple, Whitehouse Street is deep blue, Frome Gateway is orange and Temple Quarter is red.

Bristol’s transformation is already in progress. Our regeneration programme stretches from Bedminster to Temple Meads, St Judes’s to Broadmead, and includes Western Harbour, Hengrove, and Southmead. This can seem overwhelming, especially after decades of under-delivery by the Council, but we have to recognise the changes are a key part of delivering much needed housing, transport infrastructure, and low carbon energy systems. We have to work with existing communities to manage Bristol’s inevitable growth and plan for it.

We need to deliver thousands of new homes by 2036 to match continuing population growth. We also need to invest in transport networks and infrastructure so people can work and learn. We all need to have access to green spaces, and community spaces. What’s more, we need to do this in a way that will help us be a carbon neutral and climate resilient city by 2030 while also improving wildlife and ecology. We have ambitious plans to support these goals.

We’re developing the District Heat Network, connecting energy users across Bristol to a ready supply of affordable, low-carbon heating. The District Heat Network includes the installation of new energy centres at Whitehouse Street, Frome Gateway, and the City Centre. Our Heat Hierarchy will be adopted by every developer when new housing projects are confirmed, energy efficient homes will make residents use of heat more efficient, lowering the cost.

The rivers Frome, Avon, and Malago run through some of the regeneration areas, but in many parts the Frome and Malago are hidden or unloved. Working alongside developers and landowners we have the opportunity to recover and restore these precious habitats. In Bedminster Green, the River Malago will be ‘daylighted’, uncovered from underground tunnels and its natural features restored. Restoring the river brings great benefits; improved flood resilience and biodiversity throughout the river’s course and new green public spaces for people to enjoy. 

We’re focusing on keeping the roots and history of Bedminster and making sure the heritage of industrial space works in harmony with the need for housing, jobs, and our response to the climate emergency to create a modern, thriving neighbourhood. 

We are creating new communities and revitalising Hengrove, with 1,435 new homes being built at Hengrove Park, 50% of these will be affordable. This means more homes for households who cannot afford to pay market rents or buy homes at market value.

To revitalise the local economy and help businesses on East Street, we are making sure that 5,000 residents in new housing in Bedminster Green and Whitehouse Street have easy access to shops with new walking, cycling and public transport routes. A few minutes more travelling will bring residents to the city centre and beyond.

We’re to create a network of low-carbon transport routes, which will make car-free travel in Bedminster and the surrounding areas easier and excellent public transport links connecting people to Temple Quarter. In June, we secured £95 million to kickstart its first phase of delivery around Temple Meads station. 

Our ambition for the Frome Gateway area, located in St Jude’s to the east of the city centre, is for an exemplar neighbourhood. We want it to be recognised for its unique identity, ability to support healthy sustainable communities, and high-quality and sustainable design. Regeneration there, as across Bristol, must include our commitment to retaining a range of employment to help ensure a diverse and growing economy. 

We know the community is strong and but also faces some of the highest levels of socio-economic deprivation in the city. Regeneration will need to provide meaningful opportunities to improve quality of life for the local community and access to opportunity. St Jude’s is also more vulnerable than other parts of the city to flood risk and heat wave caused by climate change and responding to this is a key priority. Our Bristol Avon Flood Strategy, in cooperation with the Environment Agency and developers, will deliver flood defences that work for Bristol: better protecting homes and businesses near our city’s rivers.

Change at Frome Gateway is not driven solely by Bristol City Council. We have to work with the network of landowners, existing businesses, community groups and cultural facilities. We’ve also partnered with South Gloucestershire Council, Wessex Water, and the Environment Agency secure funding to deliver the River Frome restoration project. 

In a similar way, the Council’s city centre team is working with businesses and other stakeholder groups to revitalise the city centre through the City Centre Development and Delivery Plan’. They told us what was important to them now and in the future looking at the centre’s character, economy, housing, movement, streets, parks, green spaces, and climate change, and our design proposals will focus on this guided by the ‘Citizens Brief’.

By planning and co-ordinating development we’ll able to think strategically about how a city impacted by the pandemic can recover and thrive with a modern, vibrant, commercial centre everyone can access.

Bristol will always be changing and growing in different ways, and we have to adapt and seize the opportunities this will bring us. By having a clear vision of the future we want, with sustainable and inclusive growth at its heart, we can build it together.

Want to know more?

Details about all the regeneration projects can be found on their websites.  

All our regeneration work is in service of the Bristol Local Plan, which Cllr Nicola Beech, who has responsibility for Strategic Planning, Resilience and Floods, talked about recently

We will soon be asking what people think of draft Whitehouse Street framework when the consultation opens on 17th November.

If you would like to help us shape these projects, or receive regular updates on project developments and engagement opportunities, please take a look at the websites and sign up to our mailing lists: 

Bedminster Green

Whitehouse Street

Frome Gateway

City Centre

Temple Quarter

Western Harbour

Southmead 

The butt stops here: preventing environmental crime

Gordon Brady, 3GS's Operations Manager, smiling.
Today’s guest blog is from Gordon Brady, Operations Manager at 3GS

3GS has been working alongside Bristol City Council, tackling environmental crimes in the city through the Clean Streets Enforcement campaign, to create measurably cleaner streets.

Officers have been patrolling the city every day to cut down on environmental crime and increase environmental awareness. when caught, perpetrators are given a fixed penalty notice on the spot. The cases of those who refuse to pay are transferred to the courts for prosecution, where they are usually required to pay a larger fine.

3GS officers working on behalf of the council have been patrolling the streets of Bristol since February 2019, and so far, have issued 16,000 fixed penalty notices, with over 3,000 cases that have either been taken to or are in the process of being taken to court.

The work our officers do in preventing environmental crime is vital for our city. The crime has an extremely negative impact on our streets and costs Bristol’s council taxpayers millions of pounds to clear up every year.

3GS officers regularly prosecute the perpetrators of avoidable environmental crimes across Bristol:

  • Dropping litter on the street or from your vehicle, including chewing gum and cigarette butts. Our officers have issued over 14,000 penalty notices to individuals dropping cigarettes.
  • Graffiti: this includes painting or damaging a tree or any road signs
  • Flyposting: officers have issued fines for over 500 examples of flyposting.
  • Fly tipping: a reckless and lazy act, that damages Bristol’s wildlife.
  • Public urination and spitting: our officers have dealt with 242 cases of spitting and 38 cases of public urination.
  • Nuisance parking: like vehicles for sale.
  • There are cases of individuals not putting their domestic or commercial waste out properly.
  • Breaches of a Community Protection Notice.
  • Breach of Public Space Protection Orders, such as not clearing up your dogs’ mess; not keeping your dog under control; taking a dog into an excluded area, such as an enclosed children’s play area; drinking in a no-drinking area.
Mayor Marvin Rees, taking part in the Clean Streets Campaign with Easton primary school.

While the progress towards curbing environmental crime has evidently been positive, our hard work continues.

Recently, to help provide a more attractive street scene, 3GS officers have taken on the role of assisting their council colleagues in the investigation and enforcement of the handling of waste by Bristol’s commercial businesses, under section 47 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

In addition to this, the council offers educational programmes designed to change attitudes towards environmental crime, such as litter picks and billboard campaigns that teach the benefits of a cleaner, safer environment.

As the council takes a closer look at how we can all improve our relationship with waste during national recycling week, we celebrate a partnership that has helped transform the environmental landscape of Bristol. Supporting in the crackdown on offenders who have been responsible for the environmental deterioration of the city.

Welcoming Spaces open their doors for Bristol residents

A sign hanging on a pole, with chalk text reading: Welcome please come in.

As we start to feel the cold of the winter months, some people across Bristol will be deciding between heating their homes and putting food on the table. This is an incredibly challenging place to be in and a place I wish we weren’t. With energy bills and other costs rising, we want to make sure that the Bristol residents most impacted by the national cost of living crisis have access to help and support.

Since April I have been having regular conversations with community partners, and it was clear back then that we needed to be ready for a gear change in autumn as the cost of living continued to increase. Until recently people haven’t needed to put the heating on much but, as the colder months begin, things will get more difficult for many. 

As part of these discussions, the concept of warm, Welcoming Spaces was developed. The first of these spaces are now open. We want to support residents struggling with rising energy prices without stigmatising people. We’re already seeing that some people who haven’t face financial challenge before now are, and it’s important to us that everyone feels welcome.

A Welcoming Space is a place that is already established in the community, for example a community centre, care home, children’s centre, or places of worship, where people can meet up, socialise, keep warm and if needed access support with the cost of living crisis. These spaces are inclusive, accessible and about communities coming together.

Venues will be responding to community priorities which means what happens in each space will vary, but is likely to include Wi-Fi, access to electrical charging points, activities and community meals. There will be support provided by city-wide organisations including practical advice about money and finance, emotional wellbeing, mental health support, and employment and skills.

We have created a map of the Welcoming Spaces which are currently operating and will add more as they open their doors in the coming weeks.

The map shows where all the Welcoming Spaces are in relation to Bristol wards.
The map of Welcoming Spaces across Bristol

Bristol is a city that will continue to step up and support each other in difficult times. Welcoming Spaces have been made possible because of our incredible community, voluntary, and faith organisations, as well as city council services responding to this crisis. They draw on a community infrastructure that was strengthened during the pandemic, including volunteer groups and facilities. It is for all of us to get behind them and do what we can to make them a success.

If you have a venue that meets the criteria of a Welcoming Space please let us know by filling out our online form. A Cost of Living Social Action Small Grant is available from Quartet Community Foundation to help organisations offer a space in their community.

There are already several city organisations working together to coordinate help for the Welcoming Spaces. If you could play a part and support Welcoming Spaces please complete the form on our website. This could include providing equipment or transport or support for advice on money, welfare and mental wellbeing.

If you’d like to make a difference in your community during the cost of living crisis and you have some time to spare there are also a range of volunteering opportunities available through Can Do Bristol, from befriending and peer support, to cooking and driving. It is now well established that volunteering has real benefits for our health and wellbeing.

We know we cannot solve the cost of living crisis, but by adopting a One City approach, everyone is able to come together and help reduce cost of living pressures in their communities. The One City cost of living plan is available on the council website.

On Tuesday 11 October, a group of Bristol leaders, including myself, wrote to the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Simon Clarke MP to outline our partnership approach to supporting residents during the cost of living crisis and inviting government to visit to engage with us on how we’re responding. The letter also calls on government to improve the level of crisis funding available to local authorities to enable them to better plan support with partners.

If you or someone you know needs support, please reach out. Our We Are Bristol helpline is available for calls Mon to Fr 8.30am to 5pm – 0800 694 0184.

Welcoming Spaces List:

Ashley

  • Bristol Citadel Salvation Army, 6 Ashley Road, BS6 5NL, Bristol, Tuesday to Thursday 3pm to 7pm, 0117 992788 – Food, Hot Drinks, Signposting, Community Activities and Wifi
  • St Werburghs Community Centre, Horley Road, St. Werburgh’s, Bristol, BS2 9TJ, Monday to Sunday 9am to 9pm, 0117 955 1351 – Wifi, computers, St Werburghs Food Share and SEND Activities for Families

Avonmouth & Lawrence Weston

  • Avonmouth Community Centre, Avonmouth Road, Bristol, BS11 9EN, Monday to Thursday 10am to 4pm, Friday 1pm to 5pm, 0117 9827445 – wifi, hot drinks, signposting, community activities, digital services and Wednesday Soup Lunch (£3); Thursday Lunch Club (£5 two courses meal, booking needed)
  • The Rock Community Centre, St Peters Hall, Ridingleaze, Avon, Bristol, BS11 0QE, Monday to Friday 9am to 1:30pm, 0117 9384636 – Access to advice support, community activities and wifi
  • Shirehampton Methodist church, Junction of the High Street and Penpole Avenue, BS11 0DY, Monday to Thursday 9am to 3:30pm, 07305 066478 – advice support, food and hot drinks
  • Port of Bristol Sports & Community Hub, Nibley Rd, Shirehampton, Bristol BS11 9XW, Monday to Sunday 9am to 10pm, 0117 9823927 – signposting, community activity, hot drinks, wifi, charging points
  • Ambition Lawrence Weston, Long Cross, Lawrence Weston, BS11 0RX, Monday to Friday 11am to 4pm, 0117 9235112 – access to advice support, signposting, community activity, hot drinks, wifi and digital services
  • St Andrew’s Church, Avonmouth Road, Bristol, BS11 9EN, Monday to Friday 10am to 2pm 0117 325 8720 – Hot drink and wifi

Bedminster

  • Bedminster Children’s Centre, South Street, Bristol, BS3 3AU, Monday to Friday 8am-4pm, 0117 3746362 – access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club and access to advice support.

Bishopsworth

  • Bishopsworth Children’s Centre, Lakemead Grove, Bristol, BS13 8EA, Tuesday to Friday 8am-5pm, 0117 9781028 – access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club and access to advice support.
  • Zion Arts Space, Bisopsworth Road, Bristol, BS13 7JW, Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm, when the café is open, Tuesday until 7pm, 0117 9231212 – Wifi, hot drinks, access to advice support and Saturday 12-2pm community café.

Brislington East

  • St. Anne’s Park Children’s Centre, Lichfield Road, Bristol, BS4 4BJ, Monday to Friday 8am-5pm, 0117 3773189 – access to mental health wellbeing support and advice support.
  • Broomhill & St Anne’s Park Children’s Centre, Broomhill Infants School, Fermaine Avenue Bristol, BS4 4UY, Monday to Friday 8am-5pm, 0117-3534276 – access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club and access to advice support.
  • St Peter’s Methodist Church, 170, Allison Road, Brislington, BS4 4NZ, Tuesday 11am to 2pm, 01227 459449 – Food club, hot drinks and wifi
  • Bricks – St Anne’s Community Living Room, St Anne’s Road, Brislington, BS4 4AB, Thursdays 10am to 5pm, 07709 264 201 – Food, Hot Drinks, Signposting, Community Activities, wifi and charging points

Central

  • Redcliffe The Hub, 4, Waring House, Redcliffe, Bristol, BS1 6TB, Monday to Friday 8.30am – 10.30am and 1pm – 3pm with one evening session on Thursday – Wifi, Hot drinks, Community Activities, hot meals and computers

Cotham

  • Everyone Active – Kingsdown, Portland St, Bristol, BS2 8HL, Monday to Sunday 9am to 3pm, 0117 9031633 – Free showers and free guest pass
  • St Mathews Church, Cotham, BS6 5TP, Saturday 9:30am to 12:30pm, 0117 944 1598 – food, hot drinks, wifi and charging points.

Easton & Lawrence Hill

  • Kensington Baptist Church, Stapleton Road, Easton, Bristol, BS5 0NX, Saturday 12-2pm, 0117 951 1202 – wifi, hot drinks, charging points, Saturday 12-2pm – community café.
  • Bannerman Road Children’s Centre, All Hallows Road, Bristol, BS5 0HR, Monday to Friday 8am-4pm, 0117 9030269 – access to mental health wellbeing support and advice support.
  • Eastside Community Trust, Easton Community Centre, Kilburn Street, Bristol, BS5 6AW, Monday to Friday 8am-6pm, 01179 541409 – wifi, hot drinks, community activities, Super Supper Club Wednesday evenings and charging points.
  • St Mark’s Community Café, St Marks Road, Bristol, BS5 6HX, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, 9:30am – 4pm – Wifi, Hot drinks, community activities and Washing Machine/Tumble Dryer
  • Welllspring Settlement Centre, Barton Hill Settlement, 41 – 43 Ducie Road, Bristol, BS5 0AX – Monday to Friday 8:30-5pm, Welcome Café: Tuesday and Thursday 11am-2pm, 0117 9556971 – wifi, hot drinks, signposting, community activities, access to advice support and Community Eat Well Café.
  • Bristol Somali Resource Centre, Barton Hill Settlement, 41 – 43 Ducie Road, Bristol, BS5 0AX, Monday to Thursday 3pm to 5pm, Friday 11am to 4pm, 0117 9077994 – Wifi, charging points, advice support and hot drinks
  • Refugee Women of Bristol, Easton Family Centre, Easton, Bristol, BS5 0SQ, Thursday (Term-time only) 9:30am to 2.30pm, 0117 9415867 – advice support, mental health & wellbeing support, signposting to other services, community activities, hot drinks and wifi
  • Church of God Prophecy, 2 Tudor Road, Easton, BS5 6BN, Wednesday’s 11am to 2pm – wifi, hot drinks, food and charging points
  • Tawfiq Masjid and Centre, Aiken Street, Barton Hill, BS5 9TG, Monday to Friday 12:30pm to 8pm and Saturday to Sunday 9am to 8:30pm – wifi, hot drinks, direct access to mental health and wellbeing support, signposting, community activity, digital services and direct access to advice support
  • The Assisi Centre (Borderlands), Lawfords Gate, BS5 0RE, Monday and Tuesday 10am to 2pm, Wednesday (Bookings needed), Borderlands | Refugees | Charity I Bristol I England – Access to mental health support, Signposting, Community activity, Food, hot drinks, wifi and contact the venue for more information about activities
  • Shahjalal Jame Mosque, 468 Stapleton Road, Eastville, BS5 6PE, Monday to Sunday 3pm to 6pm, 0117 9519988 – Community activity, hot drinks, wifi and open to worshipers

Filwood

  • Knowle Children’s Centre, Leinster Avenue, Bristol, BS4 1NN, Monday to Thursday 8am-4pm; Friday 8am-3:30pm, 01173532036 – access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club and access to advice support.
  • Inns Court Christian Fellowship, Marshall Walk, Knowle West, BS4 1TR, Thursday 9am to 6pm, 0117 3771048 – Hot drinks and wifi
  • Inns Court Community Centre, 1 Marshall Walk, Bristol, BS4 1TR, Thursday 1pm to 3pm, 0117 9041220 – food club
  • Salvation Army, Padstow Road, Knowle West, BS4 1EN, Monday 10am to 2pm, 0117 9631655 – Advice support, hot drinks and wifi
  • Knowle West Healthy Living Centre, 2 Downton Rd, Bristol, BS4 1WH, Monday 12 noon to 2pm, 0117 9030018 – signposting, community activity, Hot drinks, Wifi and digital access
  • RE:WORK at Re:Store, 17-19 Filwood Broadway, Bristol, BS4 1JL, Monday to Friday 2pm to 4pm, 0117 9530689 – Community activity, food and hot drinks
  • St Barnabas Church, Daventry Road, BS4 1DQ, Thursdays 9:30am – 2pm – hot drinks

Frome Vale

  • Oldbury Court Children’s Centre, Frenchay Road, Bristol, BS16 2Qs, Monday to Friday 8am-5pm, 0117 3532899 – digital access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club and access to advice support
  • Bristol charities (Vassall Centre), Unit 1, The Vassall Centre Gil, Avenue Bristol, BS16 2QQ, Monday to Friday 8:30am – 5pm, 0117 965 9630 – Wifi, Signposting, Computer, Hot Drinks, Direct access to advice support and charging points
  • Brunelcare: Colliers Gardens Extra Care Home, 16 Colliers Gardens, Bristol, BS16 2NA, 0117 958 6336 – hot drinks and community activities

Hartcliffe & Withywood

  • Brunelcare: Waverley Gardens Extra Care Home, Waverley Gardens Queens Road, Bishopsworth, Bristol, BS13 8EL, 0117 964 1888 – hot drinks and community activities,
  • Withywood Church, Withywood Centre Queens Road, Bishopsworth, Bristol, BS13 8QA, Monday to Friday 8am – 5pm, 0117 987 8400 – wifi, hot drinks and signposting.
  • Hartcliffe Children’s Centre, Hareclive Road, Bristol, BS13 0JW, Monday to Thursday 8am-4pm; Friday 8am-3:30pm, 0117 9038633 – access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club and access to advice support.
  • South Bristol Methodist Church, South Bristol, Methodist Church Hall, Mowcroft Road, Bristol, BS13 0LT, hot drinks, Food Club, tea coffee (Friday 10am-12 noon); Community Meal (last Wednesday of the month 5pm – 6:30pm)
  • Hartcliffe and Withywood Ventures Ltd, The Gatehouse Centre, Hareclive Road, Bristol, BS13 9JN, Friday 10am to 12pm – signposting, food, hot drinks, wifi and charging points

Henbury & Brentry

  • Henbury and Brentry Community Centre, Machin Road, Bristol, BS10 7HG, Monday to Friday 9:30 am – 7:30pm, 0117 9503573 – wifi, hot drinks, community activities, digital access to advice services, charging points, Community Fridge (Monday 10:30 -2pm; Thursdays 11am – 2pm); Cafe and Community meal (Tuesday and Friday 10:30am-2pm; Thursdays 4pm-7pm)); Breakfast (Saturdays 10am-1pm)
  • Everyone Active – Henbury, Avonmouth Way, Henbury, Bristol, BS10 7NG, Monday to Sunday 9am to 3pm, 0117 3532555 – Free showers and free guest pass
  • Branch Community Church at Emmanuel Chapel, Satchfield Crescent, Henbury, BS10 7BN – lunch box and hot drinks

Hengrove & Whitchurch Park

  • Brunelcare: ABC Extra Care Centre, 56 Beech Croft Kylross Avenue, Bristol, BS14 9LZ, 01275 540177 – hot drinks.
  • St Augustine’s Church, 2 East Dundry Road, BS14 0LL, Wednesdays 10am to 4pm, Saturday breakfast 10am to 12 noon, Sunday hot drinks 3pm to 5pm, 01257 891154 – food and hot drinks
  • Christ Church, Petherton Road, BS14 9BP, Thursday 10am to 1pm, Fridays 1pm to 4pm, Sundays 11am to 12noon, 01275 891310 – Food and hot drinks

Hillfields

  • Hillfields Community Hub, Thicket Avenue, Bristol, BS16 4EH, Monday, Tuesday and Friday 11am – 3pm, 01179657711 – Wifi, hot drinks, signposting, community activities and phone charging points
  • Friends of Hillfields Library, Summerleaze, BS16 4HL, Monday 12:15pm to 18:00pm – access to advice support, signposting, community activity, hot drinks, wifi and digital services

Horfield & Lockleaze

  • Ebenezer Church, 286 Filton Avenue, Bristol, BS7 0BA, 0117 9791399 – Wifi, charging points, Foodbank Outlet (Thursdays 1-3pm), community activities, access to mental health wellbeing support and Taste community cafe. (Thursdays 10.30-12.30pm
  • Everyone Active, Dorian Rd, Horfield, Bristol BS7 0XW, Monday to Sunday 2pm to 4pm and Shower 7pm to 9pm, 0117 9031643 – Hot drinks, free showers and free guest pass
  • Lockleaze Neighbourhood Trust, 1 Fedden Buildings, Gainsborough Square, Lockleaze, Bristol, BS7 9FB, Monday to Friday 9:30am to 3:30pm, 0117 9141129 – advice support, signposting to other services, food, hot drinks and wifi
  • Lockleaze sport centre, Bonnington Walk, Lockleaze, Bristol BS7 9XF, Monday 11:30am to 13:30pm, 01174568955 – food and hot drinks
  • The Vench, Romney Ave, Lockleaze, Bristol BS7 9TB, Tuesday 9:30am to 3:30pm, 07710392078 – Food and hot drinks

Knowle

  • Knowle Methodist Church, Knowle Methodist Church, 9 Redcatch Road, Knowle, BS4 2EP, Monday 11am to 2pm – wifi and hot drinks
  • Totterdown Baptist (Jerman Hall), Wells Road, BS4 2AX, Fridays 2pm to 6pm – community activity, food, hot drinks and wifi
  • Redcatch Community Garden, Broadwalk Redcatch Park, Knowle, BS4, Monday afterschool to 5pm, Tuesday 12pm to 5pm – Food and Hot Drinks.
  • Redcatch Community Church, Broadwalk, Knowle, Bristol, BS4 2RB, Friday 10am to 4pm – signposting, community activity, food, hot drinks and wifi

Redcliffe

  • The Hub, 4 Waring House, Redcliffe, Bristol, BS1 6TB, Monday to Friday 8:30am to 10:30am and 1pm to 3pm, Thursday 6pm to 8pm, 07928 249523 – Community activities, Food, Hot Drinks, wifi and computers

Redland

  • Cairns Road Baptist Church, Westbury Park, Bristol, BS6 7TH Tuesday 6pm to 9pm, 01179425669 – Hot Drinks, Wifi and Charging points

Shirehampton

  • Shirehampton Library, Station Road, Shirehampton, Bristol, BS11 9TU, Tuesday 3pm to 5pm – Food, Hot drinks, wifi and computers
  • Shirehampton Public Hall, 32 Station Road, Shirehampton, Bristol, BS11 9TX, Thursday 10am to midday – Community activities, hot drinks and wifi
  • Cotswold Community Association, Dursley Road, Shirehampton, BS11 9HX, Thursday 10am to 12pm – signposting, community activity, hot drinks, and wifi

Southmead

  • Southmead Development Trust, Greenway Centre, Doncaster Road, Bristol, BS10 5PY, Monday to Friday: 8:30am to 8:45pm and Saturday to Sunday: 9am to 5pm, 0117 950 3335 – hot drinks available
  • Shahporan Islamic Centre Bristol, 3 Doncaster Lane, BS10 5QD, Monday to Sunday 4pm to 8:30pm, 07764 280004 – wifi, access to mental health wellbeing support, signposting, community activity and direct access to advice support

Southville

  • BS3 Community Development, The Southville Centre, Beauley Road, Southville, BS3 1QG, Monday to Thursday: 8am to 8pm; Friday 8am-6pm, 01179231039 – computers, hot drinks, outreach activity, access to mental health wellbeing support, signposting, community activities, digital services, access to advice support, Bedminster Food Club (at United Reformed Church on West Street); Café open from 8-5 daily (introducing pay it forward)

St. George

  • Speedwell Children’s Centre, Speedwell Road, Bristol, BS5 7SY, Monday  to Friday 9am-3pm, 0117 9030206 – access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club and access to advice support.
  • Siri Guru Singh Sabha Gurdwara Bristol, 301-307 Church Road, St George, BS5 8AA, Monday 10:30am to 11:30am, Tuesday 10:30am to 11:30am ad Sunday 10:30am to 2pm – wifi, community activities, charging points, food and hot drinks
  • The Beehive, 19a Stretford Road, Whitehall, Bristol, BS5 7AW (St George), Monday, Wednesday and Friday 9am to 12:30 noon, Tuesday and Thursday 9am to 4pm, 0117 9354471 – signposting, Community Activity, food, hot drinks, wifi and charging points

St Paul’s

  • St Paul’s Nursery School and Children’s Centre, Little Bishop Street, Bristol, BS2 9JF, 0117 9030337 – access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club and access to advice support.
  • St Agnes Chruch, Thomas Street, St Pauls, Bristol, BS2 9JF, Monday to Friday 8am to 4pm, 0117 9030337 – advice support, mental health support and food club
  • Everyone Active – St Paul’s, Newfoundland Rd, St Paul’s, Bristol BS2 9NH, Monday to Sunday 9am to 3pm, 0117 3773405 – Free showers and free guest pass
  • A.P.E Project CIC / St Paul’s Adventure Playground, Fern Street, St Pauls, Bristol, BS2 9LN, Thursday and Friday 3:15pm to 7:00pm, Saturday 1:00pm to 5:00pm, 0117 9542145 – signposting, community activities, food, hot drinks, charging points, open to children, families and young people.

Stockwood

  • Stockwood Children’s Centre, Whittock Road, Bristol, BS14 8DQ, Monday to Thurs 8:30am-3:30pm, 0117 3533506 – access to mental health wellbeing support, food bank, food club access to advice support.
  • BS14 Youth Club, Stockwood Lane, Stockwood, BS14 8SJ, Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10am to 1pm – community activities, hot drinks, wifi and charging points

Westbury-on-Trym & Henleaze

  • Trinity-Henleaze United Reformed Church, Waterford Road, Henleaze, Bristol, BS9 4BT, Tuesday 2pm to 4pm and Friday 10am to 5pm, 0117 9623431 – hot drinks

A weekend of StoryTrails in Bristol

In the foreground of the photo is Councillor Ellie King smiling, with the walls and walkway to Bristol City Hall behind her.
Today’s blog is from Cllr Ellie King, Cabinet Member for Public Health and Communities and Labour Councillor for Hillfields

StoryTrails came to Bristol this month, giving Bristolians the chance to explore untold histories of the city in a unique way. The event brought history to life in our streets and at Central Library through a range of creative augmented and virtual reality (VR) experiences. 

It was a great weekend and lovely to see the Central Library so busy, triple the number of visitors joined us compared to a typical weekend, with loads of new faces joining the library and taking out books for the first time. 

StoryTrails taught participants about unique historical stories through a variety of different experiences, these included: 

  • Using VR headsets in the Holden Foyer showing a choice of films to experience, immersing people in history from punk to South Asian cuisine  
  • Viewing the film created by Bristol producer and StoryMapper Marcus Smith, made from thousands of 3D scans and film interviews, uncovering local and community histories in Bristol on 5 metre curved 360o screen in the library café 
  • Creating avatars (a 3D version of yourself) using the free Scaniverse app and LiDar technology on iPads to create augmented reality photos, which were printed out for people to take home on a postcard. 
  • Setting off on guided augmented reality walking tours around Bristol, led by actors and the Bristol TrailMaker Lucy Fulford to explore the history of the SweetMart in Easton and stories from the South Asian Ugandan community in Bristol. 
The image shows a group of participants watching one of the many films telling the story's of Bristol and Britain. The crowd are at the bottom of the image with a big curving projector in front of them.

The walking tour is still available to download for free on the StoryTrails app and includes six stops around the centre of Bristol. Scan locations in the city with the camera on your phone or device and watch video clips and audio extracts projected onto your screen. The whole tour takes about an hour 30 minutes to complete. 

I want to thank the Central Library team for making it happen and the extra members of library staff drafted in that helped with the smooth running of the event on the day. A special thanks goes to our StoryTrails library staff ambassadors – who were all brilliant and are now expert 3D scanners!  

As part of the legacy of the project, StoryTrails are gifting the library VR headsets and Google handsets to run their own AR walking tours, extra iPads and mini printers for photo postcard printing, so they will be hosting more events and running more 3D scanning sessions in branch libraries across Bristol.  

Hannover, Bordeaux and Bristol

Deputy Mayor Asher Craig takes up the centre of the image smiling. She is wearing a green and yellow headdress, with a green and blue stripped Blazer and white t-shirt. She has a multicoloured necklace around her neck and matching earrings. In the background you can see a building that's blurred. There is a bush below the building.
Today’s blog is from deputy mayor Asher Craig

The Haitian Uprising of 1791, in Saint Domingue, played a crucial role in the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade. In memory, 23 August marks the UN’s International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition, providing a focus for collective remembrance and consideration of the legacy of the atrocity and how it impacts today’s world.

This past year city representatives including myself and Mayor Marvin Rees have been working hard to support the dialogue and learning from Bristol’s role in the trans-atlantic slave trade, including through the Bristol History Commission, the Legacy Steering Group, and publishing  Project Truth to help inform how the city responds and moves forward.

Alongside this and to help inform both our own learning and that of two of our twin cities,  Bordeaux and Hannover, with whom we mark our 75th twinning anniversary this year, I have been privileged to visit both and pay respect to the victims of slavery and remember our cities’ roles in the trans-atlantic slave trade.

In May, a small delegation from Bristol, including myself, Professor Olivette Otele, a historian of slavery and memory of enslavement; Sado Jirde, Director of Black South West Network; Dr Mena Fombo, a Bristol International Ambassador, entrepreneur, film director and global speaker on diversity and inclusion; and Dr Emmanuel Adukwu, Deputy Head of the Department of Applied Sciences at the University of the West of England, were invited to take part in Bordeaux Slavery Memory Week.

The image shows the group standing together in a line smiling in front of a statue in the Bordeaux government buildings. From left to right is the film director and global speaker on diversity and inclusion, the Bristol International Ambassador, Deputy Mayor Asher Craig, Sado Jirde, Dr Mena Fombo. A statue sits in the centre of the phot just above the group, in a little gap in the wall. On the left of the image you can see the grand building with huge windows.
Deputy Mayor Asher Craig is pictured with other members of the Bristol delegation in Bordeaux

As a fellow port city, also actively involved in the slave trade, they have embedded learning about the city’s slave history in a way Bristol can actively learn from. All Bordeaux school children join a targeted education programme outlining history of enslavement, as well as a memorial garden, trail, and permanent museum exhibition.

Last week I was invited to Hannover to take part in a wide programme of events to mark our 75th twinning anniversary, including a signing of a shared Memorandum of Agreement for future collaboration and panel discussions including one as part of the recent opening of the jointly Hannover/Bristol curated ‘About Golden Carriages and colonial past – Hannover, England and Slavery’ at their Historical Museum.

The image shows Deputy Mayor Asher Craig on the right, wearing a blue headdress and top. She is discussing with a man, wearing a blue suit that takes up the left of the image. In between them is a painting, displaying a gold chariot.
Deputy Mayor, Asher Craig in Hannover

It was an opportunity to share more about the work of the History Commission and Legacy Steering group as they also explore their own role in the colonial past and how we can jointly work together on this and other shared priorities to achieve a better and more informed future for all our citizens.

I was also honoured to be able to see the culmination of Bristol’s Youth RISE Dance group’s collaboration project with FZH Linden Hannover with a performance representing human rights at the ceremony marking our 75th twinning anniversary at Hannover City Hall which was  powerful and moving.

We would like to give our thanks to both Hannover and Bordeaux City Councils, City Partners, our Twinning Associations, the French Foreign Ministry for facilitating these special visits, and all those who we met and engaged with as part of the programme. It was a chance to share experiences, find solutions to common problems and support each other in achieving our goals.

Events to commemorate the 75th twinning anniversary with Bordeaux, as well as Hannover, are taking place throughout the year. More information about the events can be found on the Visit West website.

Bedminster Lantern Parade

Today’s guest blog is from Ade Williams, chair of the Bedminster Winter Lantern Parade and Superintendent Pharmacist at Bedminster Pharmacy.

There is great power in togetherness, celebrating each other’s contribution to a joint endeavour. Yet as a society, we are faced with ever-present reminders that our communities are unfairly divided. Sadly the age at which we first experience this only continues to get younger, shattering something that is forever lost.

Over the last 18 months, many of us have discovered an awakened desire to see positive changes in our society. Sadly life with all its demands will start to rob us of the chance to pursue those changes. Do you remember saying, “When this is over, I will not go back to the old ways?”

Ade Williams, Chair of the Bedminster Winter Lantern Parade

Bedminster Winter Lantern Parade has launched a fundraising appeal to raise the £15,000 needed to deliver the tenth anniversary extravaganza, South Bristol’s biggest Winter event. As Chair of the organising steering group, I know a lot about the dedication and work of delivering this event. All the volunteers, artists, teachers, and sponsors that support children across our community express themselves, showcase, and celebrate their work together.

One of the core values of the Parade is that it is proactively inclusive. Children from the nine schools involved represent the ever-increasing rich diversity of our South Bristol communities. Some even over-representing the racial diversity and socio-economic profiles across our shared City.

One of the event’s ambitions is to tackle why some children create lanterns in school but do not participate in the Parade. We feel this is very important. Working with friends and peers to create something exciting must be matched with the joy and thrill of showcasing it. Suppose many more young people can see how much the community loves and appreciates them; the potential fruits of such life experiences can be transformational.

The Parade’s link to better health and wellbeing is an added bonus. Art and creativity are positive health and wellbeing influencers. Collective effort and volunteering increase self-worth while walking the length of the Parade will reduce your blood pressure, burn calories and increase your heart rate — likewise for dancing. As for dancing to the rhythm of the music, you have an expressive licence.

The Bedminster Lantern Parade is a transformational event. Your much needed financial support and contributions enrich our community, sowing seeds to produce a healthier, inclusive, equitable society. Building that better future is the collective effort linking us all together.

Join us here: https://www.lanternparade.org/

Apprentices building Bristol’s economy across all sectors

Today’s guest blog comes from Cllr Anna Keen, cabinet lead for Education and Skills.

Apprenticeships play a huge part in our efforts in building an inclusive, flourishing economy that doesn’t leave people behind.  They bring together training and real life experience to ensure the individuals completing each programme are work-ready, demonstrating first class experience of work, transferable skills that most employers look for and high quality qualifications.

Yet there are still myths about apprenticeships, who can do them, the types of subjects they cover and they often still come with a stigma of being a second class choice. I often see schools and parents guiding their young people towards other options, perhaps not fully understanding a modern day apprenticeship.

This week is National Apprenticeships Week, which shines a light on apprentices and their employers across the country and how much apprenticeship programmes have changed over the years.

Did you know…

  • Apprenticeships are suitable for anyone aged 16 or over?
  • Apprenticeships are available at a range of levels, from Level 2 for those just starting their career to Level 7 Master’s Degree equivalent across professional and management roles?
  • Apprenticeships cover a range of sectors, including law, finance, education, sales, marketing, IT as well as more traditional subjects?
  • Doing an apprenticeship can increase your long term earning potential and are also great for those returning to work or changing career?
  • Apprenticeships offer a competitive salary whilst all your training costs are paid, including at degree level?

For the employers that take on apprentices, the benefits are far-reaching. Across the UK, 78% of these organisations reported improved activity across the workforce, 74% reported improved product or service quality, 65% recognised the new ideas that apprentices bring to their organisation and 83% would recommend other business take on apprentices (Learners and Apprentices Survey 2018 report).

At Bristol City Council we currently have 160 apprentices across all areas (including one in the Mayor’s Office) and aim to increase that to 200 by 2020. Some of the council’s apprentices recently interviewed Mayor Rees on what apprentices bring to Bristol and the organisation.

This week there are a number of opportunities across the city to find out more about apprenticeships, including:

  • A digital open day on Wednesday 6 March, 10am-3pm with a range of organisations answering questions about apprenticeships on Twitter.  Anyone with an apprenticeship question can get in touch with one of the participating organisations via Twitter using the hashtag #ApprenticeOpenDay 

Drop in sessions at The Mall, The Galleries and City of Bristol College

  • Employer events at Aerospace Bristol

For more information about all of these events, visit www.bristol.works/apprenticeships

This week also sees the launch of a brand new website, as part of the Healthier Together partnership, which promotes apprenticeships across the region’s health and social care services.

Bristol is also taking part in the government’s Five Cities Apprenticeship Diversity Hub project, which is a pilot scheme designed to broaden the appeal of apprenticeships to more diverse audiences. It includes Bristol alongside Birmingham, Leicester, London and Manchester. Locally it is also supported by the West of England Combined Authority (WECA).

Apprenticeships provide us with a talent pipeline for the future and help us develop leaders for the future – I am proud to be supporting National Apprenticeship Week as a celebration of the energy and passion that apprentices bring to our city.